v.194 uploaded     24th January 2016
Sharnbrook Observatory

Welcome to my web site!

This version includes new images of the Moon, with more images taken recently to be uploaded as time
allows me.

All of the images on this site are my own, taken using amateur telescopes and equipment.

As ever, I hope this encourages you to get out there and enjoy the treasures of our universe at first hand.

Best Wishes,  

Peter Garbett



Galleries...


African Skies     Mars                Venus            Equipment          Comets          Sun



The Aurora          Deep Sky       Moon          Jupiter             Saturn            NLC




Solar cycle comparison


Microsoft Excel Worksheet


The above graph is from my own sunspot counts for almost 20 years. It clearly shows the mor recent cycle now in decline and how much weaker this cycle
is than its predecessor.








20.01.16  22:59 UTC
Prinz and curious rilles
C14 @ f/27; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter








20.01.16  23:37 UTC
Clavius
C14 @ f/27; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter










01.11.15  02:12 UTC
Lacus Mortis with Burg (right) and Eudoxus (lower left)
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter; drizzled x1.5





01.11.15  02:14 UTC
Posidonius on the edge of Mare Serenitatis
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter; drizzled x1.5





01.11.15  02:18 UTC
Aristoteles and Eudoxus
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter










01.11.15  02:18 UTC
Aristoteles and Eudoxus
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter; drizzled x1.5









01.11.15  02:20 UTC
Plinius (just left of centre), Dawes (above centre), Vitruvius (upper right) and Jansen with rille above
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter





01.11.15  02:23 UTC
Carrel  (upper right), Ross (upper left) and Arago (lower left)
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter








01.11.15  02:23 UTC
Carrel  (upper right), Ross (upper left) and Arago (lower left)
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter; drizzled x1.5





01.11.15  02:20 - 02:23 UTC mozaic of two sequences
Plinius down to Arago
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter





01.11.15  02:20 - 02:26 UTC mozaic of three sequences
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter

Western Mare Tranquillitatis
The prominent 26km diameter crater Arago is flanked by two large domes: Arago Alpha to its
north and Arago Beta  to its west.Although two of the largest and steepest domes on the Moon,
they only rise a few hundred metres and Arago Alpha had its slope angle measured as 1.4 degrees
back in 1959. It is thought that lunar domes are small shield volcanoes like those found in
Iceland. Shield volcanoes are formed from the quiet eruption of lava from a central crater.
The ghostly ring to the east of Arago is called Lamont and is thought to be a small mutli-ringed
basin subsequently flooded by the Tranquillitatis lavas*. Evidence for this comes from the mascon
(mass concentration) found here, detected by the gravitational effect on space craft orbits.
*As the frantic cratering rate drew to a close around 3.8 billion years ago, more than a dozen
asteroid-size objects at least 100km in diameter collided with the Moon. This has been termed
the 'late heavy bombardment'. These huge impacts created the mare basins. The heat from
long-lived radioactive elements such as thorium and uranium began to melt the inside of the Moon.
From 3.8 to 3.1 billion years ago, great floods of molten rock gushed up from the interior, filling
the impact basins and forming the mare basalts we see today.






01.11.15  02:26 UTC
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter; drizzled x1.5

Arago, Ritter, Sabine and the Apollo 11 landing site not far from the crater Moltke (see version below)
Ritter and Sabine, the prominent craters towards lower left are thought to be examples of FFCs - floor-fractured craters. Lunar scientists
noticed that many craters near the edge of basins have shallow and complex floors. Ritter and Sabine are only 700 - 750 m deep, compared
to 3,000 - 3,500 m typical of craters of this diameter. The idea here is that magma rising up through basin fractures, pushed up the floors
of these craters. The broad, flat-floored rilles between Sabine and Moltke along the southern 'shore' of Mare Tranquillitatis, formed in a
similar way. Such fractures form when the sheer weight of the mare lavas cause the basin floor to subside, fracturing the brittle lava near
its edges.







01.11.15  02:28 UTC
Torricelli R
C14 @ f/11; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter; drizzled x1.5





01.11.15  02:37 UTC
Aristoteles
C14 @ f/27; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter





01.11.15  03:24 UTC
Eudoxus
C14 @ f/27; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter






01.11.15  03:30 UTC
Posidonius
C14 @ f/27; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter







01.11.15  03:35 UTC
Burg within Lacus Mortis
C14 @ f/27; Flea 3 CCD; Trutek type 1 R filter






Other sites of personal interest...


Amateurs                                                                          Commercial

Damian Peach's site                                                                Telescope House

Ian King's site                                                                         Coronado Hydrogen Alpha Filters

Jack Newton's site                                                                  Celestron U.K.

Nik Szymanek's site                                                                Meade

Rob Gendler's site                                                                  Starlight Xpress Ltd

Stefan Seip's site                                                                   True Technology Ltd

Steve Mandel's site                                                                Ian King Imaging

Thierry Legault's site                                                             Modern Astronomy

Brierley Hill Solar


Organisations/resources                                              Software

Astro buy/sell                                                                       Christian Buil's software      

American Meteor Society                                                       Registax for processing webcam images

Big Bear Solar Observatory latest images of the Sun                Firecapture software for Flea 3 etc

British Astronomical Association                                            Satellite predictions                

Cloud forecast for UK                                                           WinJUPOS

Cloudy Nights reviews                                                          Auto Stakkert!

Horace Dall, 1982  (video by Robin Scagell)                           Deep Sky Stacker

U.S. Naval Observatory Clock  UTC                                        GradientXTerminator

Luton Astronomical Society                                                   PHD autoguiding, DSLR shutter control etc                           

Observing Planets around other Stars via Transits!                  Stellarium planetarium software

Periodic error test results for mounts                                    Starry Dave software e.g. solar animations
(Google translator from French)

Prince Albert (South Africa) site                                            Noel Carboni's software

Solar astronomer's library

Solar Influences Data Analysis Center (International sunspot numbers)

SpaceWeather.com for solar activity and far more!

Unisys Jet Stream Forecast to assess likely seeing conditions

Jet Stream Forecast

wunderground.com weather models to assess likely seeing conditions

Uk astro imaging forum

UK IR satellite cloud cover





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Established October 2000.           Copyright: P.J.Garbett