Mars - the red planet


Icy blue clouds of Mars...

This aesthetically pleasing image was featured
on SpaceWeather.com on 17 December 2007.





Mars 2014


Mars in Virgo
22nd March 2014
Lovely colour contrast between Mars and Spica
Canon EOS 450D (modded); 28mm lens; 30s exposure








               


17.05.14  Mare Acidalium, Mare Erythraeum and morning mist
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate; ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
IGB centred on 21:21.5 UTC: I=21:21.6 UTC; G=21:23.7 UTC; B=21:19.3 UTC
WinJupos de-rotated images. I = WinJupos combination of 2 videos





    



    

16.05.14  Mare Acidalium, Mare Erythraeum and volcanoes emerging from morning mist
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate; ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
IGB centred on 22:20.5 UTC: I=22:16.2UTC; G=22:25.2 UTC; B=22:20.2 UTC
WinJupos de-rotated images
Separate B and G channels  shown below the colour images. B shows clouds especially well



         
28.04.14  Syrtis Major blue cloud (at 8 o'clock); orographic cloud over Elysium (near centre)
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate; ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector;  PGR Flea 3 CCD (doubled size of image)
IGB: I=22:38 UTC; G=22:32 UTC; B=22:26 UTC
Separate IR, G and B channels  shown below the colour images




                 

18.04.14  Syrtis Major with dazzling cloud in the giant impact basin, Hellas above
A spiral of cloud around North Polar Cap, perhaps seen in B image?
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
IGB: I=22:21UTC; G=22:30 UTC; B=22:26 UTC; C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
Separate IR, G and B channels and north-at-the-top  colour image shown below south-at-the-top colour image


         

                   

18.04.14  Syrtis Major and Sinus Sabaeus, with morning mist over Chryse
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate; ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
IGB centred on 23:06.3 UTC: I=23:07.3UTC; G=23:10.4 UTC; B=23:01.1 UTC.
WinJupos de-rotated images from four IR, three B and two G video sequences
Separate IR, G and B channels  shown below the colour images


IR 23:11 UTC     IR 23:53 UTC



B  23:14 UTC




         
17.04.14  Syrtis Major near limb plus lots of mist
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
IGB: I=23:14UTC; G=23:22 UTC; B=23:18 UTC



         

          


15.04.14  Syrtis Major with cloud at extreme right (evening) edge;
Sinus Sabaeus and Mare Acidalium well shown with slight morning mist
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate; ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
IGB centred on 23:26.9 UTC: I=23:27.7UTC; G=23:28.5 UTC; B=23:24.4 UTC.
WinJupos de-rotated images from three IR, two B and two G video sequences
Separate IR, G and B channels  shown below the colour images




     
15.04.14  Mare Acidalium
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
IGB: I=00:23 UTC; G=00:31 UTC; B=00:26 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
Separate IR, G and B channels shown below colour image.







         

This pair of IGB images from 11.04.14 were taken about 25 minutes apart.
If you cross your eyes and merge the two images you'll get a 3D effect!



    

This pair of IR images from 11.04.14 were taken 27 minutes apart.
If you cross your eyes and merge the two images you'll get a 3D effect!






09.04.14  Mare Acidalium
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
IGB: I=23:25.8 UTC; G=23:21.1 UTC; B=23:28.4 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD




 
       
05.04.14  A series of equatorial clouds including orographic clouds
around giant extinct volcano Olympus Mons
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
IGB: I=00:35.6 UTC; G=00:31.9 UTC; B=00:28.8 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
Separate IR, G and B channels shown below colour image.



     

05.04.14  A series of equatorial clouds including orographic clouds
around giant extinct volcano Olympus Mons
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
IGB: I=00:05.3 UTC; G=00:12.1 UTC; B=00:09.0 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
Separate IR, G and B channels shown below colour image.


04.04.14  Valles Marineris (just right and below centre)
and the North Polar Cap near the top of the image
Astronomik IR > 742nm filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
IR = 23.52.4 UTC from de-rotated combination of 4 video sequences in WinJupos




                      

Three differently processed colour images. The far left version emphasises the clouds more and shows the blue
equatorial cloud band very distinctly above Syrtis Major. The white patch of cloud left of centre are orographic
clouds above the Elysium volcanoes.

         

23.03.14  Syrtis Major and equatorial cloud band (poor seeing)
Notice how Syrtis Major disappears beneath the equatorial cloud band
as one progresses to G and B filters!
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter; Astronomik IR filter
ASH atmospheric dispersion corrector deployed
IGB: I=01:40 UTC; G=01:43 UTC; B=01:46 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
Separate IR, G and B channels shown below colour images.









Mars 2012


                    
30.03.12
Syrtis Major left of centre and Sinus Sabaeus
extending horizontally above centre
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter
and  Baader IR > 742nm filter
I(60%)IGB: I=21:02:30 UTC; G=21:04:30 UTC; B=21:06 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD


IGB version showing haze over Hellas better is shown below...





29.03.12  Syrtis Major to left
Baader IR > 742nm filter  IR=19:41 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD






27.03.12  Mare Acidalium
Baader IR > 742nm filter  IR=22:54 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD










24.03.12  Notice the volcano poking
through the blue mist at extreme right!
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter
and  Baader IR > 742nm filter
IGB: I=22:40 UTC; B=22:42 UTC; G=22:44 UTC
C14 with x3 TV Barlow;  PGR Flea 3 CCD





23.03.12  22:49 UTC
Baader IR > 742nm filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD









19.03.12  23:18 UTC
Valles Marineris and Olympus Mons
Baader IR > 742nm filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD









Rarely seen elevated 'dust' ...







                   


15.03.12
The G and B filters show some elevated (dust?) between about '12 o'clock' and '1 o'clock'
positions at the edge of the disk. This was simltaneously recorded by several other
observers. Interestingly, the September 2012 edition of 'Sky and Telescope' shows a
dramatic image by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's camera HiRise of a gigantic 20km high
dust devil sweeping across the northern region of Amazonis Planitia on 14th March.
Trutek Type 1  G, B filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter
and  Baader IR > 742nm filter
IGB: I=00:20 UTC; B=00:15 UTC; G=00:18 UTC
C14 with x3 TV Barlow;  PGR Flea 3 CCD






The same phenomena was seen a little later in this G filtered image
taken at 00:28 UTC:












14.03.12  22:50 UTC
Nice cloud details in this green filter image.
Centre: Olympus Mons orographic clouds.
Trutek Type 1  G filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter
C14 with x3 TV Barlow;  PGR Flea 3 CCD









        
14.03.12  G = 22:37 UTC and B = 22:34 UTC respectively
Trutek Type 1  G and B  filters  with Baader UV/IR rejection filter
C14 with x3 TV Barlow;  PGR Flea 3 CCD








 

14.03.12  Abundant clouds/hazes
Olympus Mons is dark spot just right of centre
Trutek Type 1  R,G, B filters  (Baader UV/IR rejection filter added to B and G)
RGB: R=22:05:30 UTC; B=22:08 UTC; G=22:10 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD




14.03.12  22:12 UTC
Valles Marineris and Tharsis Volcanoes
Baader IR > 742nm filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD




02.03.12  Syrtis Major
Trutek Type 1  R filter  R= 00:34:50 UTC
C14 with TV x3 Barlow @ f/39;  
PGR Flea 3 CCD, 0".08 per pixel





                                          


                                 1743                     
02.03.12  Syrtis Major and clouds
Notice the ice cap dislocation and the bright cloud over Elysium.
In the coloured RGB composite, notice the subtle clouds running from Elysium to above Syrtis Major.
Trutek Type 1  R,G and B filters with Baader UV/IR cut filters applied to G and B
R= 00:34:50 UTC; G = 00:30:08 UTC; B = 00:27:30 UTC
C14 with TV x3 Barlow @ f/39;  PGR Flea 3 CCD, 0".08 per pixel






                     

02.03.12  Syrtis Major and clouds
Trutek Type 1  R,G, B filters  (Baader UV/IR rejection filter added to B and G)
RGB: R=00:09 UTC; B=00:11 UTC; G=00:14 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD
Separate R, G and B channels shown below colour image.








02.03.12  Syrtis Major
Baader IR > 742nm filter
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD








25.02.12  Syrtis Major to left
Baader IR > 742nm filter  IR=01:16 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD





25.02.12
Baader IR > 742nm filter  IR=00:58 UTC
C14 with x2.5 power mate;  PGR Flea 3 CCD





11.02.12  Abundant clouds/hazes
Martian super grand canyon is at 10 o'clock: separate R,G and B beneath
Trutek Type 1  R,G, B filters  (Baader UV/IR rejection filter added to B and G)
RGB: R=01:23 UTC; B=01:20 UTC; G=01:18 UTC
C14 with x2 Barlow;  PGR Flea 3 CCD






Identifying Craters on Mars...

I must admit, not so long ago I would have thought it unlikely that it would be possible to
image craters on Mars from the U.K. using an amateur telescope, but as these images show,
the dark floors of some large Martian craters can indeed be seen. I have confirmed these
carefully using  Google Mars, a shaded Mariner 9 relief map of Mars as shown in Briggs and
Taylor (1982) The Cambridge Photographic Atlas of the Planets, C.U.P., pp164-5 and
from roving-mouse.com Mars Atlas.







19.12.07

The crater floor indicated here is that of:
Gale  (172km)








   16.11.07

   Working from top to bottom, the three
   craters identified are:
   Huygens  (456km)
   Schroeter  (337km)
   Baldet  (195km)






Mars 2009-10





In the image above, we see the Tharsis volcanoes as dark dots on the
right in blue haze/cloud. The more isolated lower dark dot is Olympus
Mons. The North Polar Cap is much less prominent than it was several
months ago as we progress from the Martian northern spring towards
summer.







                   4.3.10
              Tharsis volcanoes just beginning to rotate into view in hazy cloud.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 11.72"; Phase = 95.5%; altitude = 62 deg.; C.M. long. = 61.9 deg.
                  Seeing mediocre; transparency good.
                        RGB (R = 21:31UT; G = 21:36UT; B =21:34UT)
                        C14 @ F47; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R, G, B filters, Baader UV/IR reject









              1.3.10
              Solis Lacus with Valles Marineris below.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 12.01"; Phase = 96.1%; altitude = 61 deg.; C.M. long. =98.8 deg.
                  Seeing fair; transparency good.
                        R[G]B (R =22:13:30UT; B =22:16UT)
                        C14 @ F45; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter



Separate R, G, B channels.









              20.2.10
              Orographic clouds of the Tharsis volcanoes (left). Blue haze over Aetheria, Aethiopis
                  and Mare Chronium towards the South Pole.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 12.86"; Phase = 97.7%; altitude = 58 deg.; C.M. long. = 198.8 deg.
                  Seeing and transparency both good.
                        RGB (R =23:32UT; G=23:37UT; B =23:34UT)
                        C14 @ F45; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter




Separate R, G, B channels.











              20.2.10
              Orographic clouds of the Tharsis volcanoes (left). Blue haze over Aetheria,
                  Aethiopis and Mare Chronium towards the South Pole.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 12.87"; Phase = 97.7%; altitude = 61 deg.; C.M. long. = 184.4 deg.
                  Seeing and transparency both good.
                        RGB (R =22:34UT; G=22:40:30UT; B =22:37UT)
                        C14 @ F45; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter






Separate R, G, B channels.






        




              17.2.10
              Orographic clouds of the Tharsis volcanoes (left), with Olympus Mons brightest.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 13.13"; Phase = 98.2%; altitude = 58 deg.; C.M. long. = 192.7 deg.
                  Seeing 6/10. Transparency: misty.
                        RGB (R =21:20UT; G= 21:17UT: B =21:23UT)
                        C14 @ F45; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter






Separate R, G, B channels.











                 31.1.10
              Blue Syrtis cloud (left). Bright spot near edge of North Polar Cap is the frosted
                  crater Lomonosov. Extensive bright clouds over Tharsis/Tempe extending into Chryse.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 14.06"; Phase = 99.9%; altitude = 55 deg.; C.M. long. = 359.9 deg.
                  Seeing 4/10.
                        RGB (R =22:31UT; G= 22:37UT: B =22:34UT)
                        C14 @ F39; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter

Separate R,G,B channels.









26.1.10  Seeing: very good but foggy. From left to right: 21:48 UTC, 22:03 UTC, 22:13:30 UTC, 22:20 UTC,
22:36 UTC, 22:44 UTC, 23:48 UTC, 23:54 UTC

Apparent angular diameter = 14.10"; Phase = 99.9%; altitude = 46, 48, 49, 50, 52, 53, 58, 58.5 deg. resp.
C.M. long. = 32.3, 35.9, 38.5, 40.1, 44.0, 45.9, 61.6, 63.0 deg. resp.
C14 @ F39; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R filter, Baader UV/IR rejection filter


The images above pair up nicely to give 3D views if you cross your eyes and allow them to
merge in the middle! Please note the small grey dust incrusion from Baltia into the North Polar
Cap on several images. The bright spot near the edge of the NPC below mare Acidalium is the
frosted crater Lomonosov.










              26.1.10
              Note the haze over Argyre (top).
                        Apparent angular diameter = 14.10"; Phase = 99.9%; altitude = 52 deg.;
                        C.M. long. = 44.5 deg.
                  Seeing : very good, but fog spoiling transparency.
                        RGB (R =22:36UT; G= 22:42UT: B =22:38UT)
                        C14 @ F39; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rej. filter













                 17.1.10
              Orographic clouds of the Tharsis volcanoes.
                        Apparent angular diameter = 13.87"; Phase = 99.2%; altitude = 50 deg.; C.M. long. = 133.8 deg.
                  Seeing 6/10. Transparency good.
                        RGB (R =23:17:30UT; G= 23:27UT: B =23:22UT)
                        C14 @ F45; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter




    
Separate R,G,B channels.












            4.1.10
          Syrtis Major near centre, clouds to its left and Sinus Sabaeus to its right.
                 Apparent angular diameter = 12.93"; Phase = 96.9%; altitude = 55 deg.; C.M. long. = 290.6 deg.
             Seeing 6/10. Transparency good.
                 RGB (R = 01:36UT; G= 01:43UT: B =01:39:30UT)
                 C14 @ F45; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter




   Separate R,G,B channels.





            1.1.10
          Syrtis Major to left of centre and Sinus Sabaeus upper right.
                 Apparent angular diameter = 12.67"; Phase = 96.3%; altitude = 49 deg.; C.M. long. = 305.2 deg.
             Seeing 3/10. Transparency good, but clouds interfering and a nagging breeze.
                 R[G]B (R = 00:46UT; B= 00:50UT)
                 C14 @ F39; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter











  29.10.09
  Faint equatorial cloud band (?) visible just above centre cutting into 'V' of Syrtis Major.
   Apparent angular diameter = 7.77"; Phase = 88.6%; altitude = 58 deg.; C.M. long. = 257 deg.
  Seeing good. Transparency quite poor with mist/fog.
   RGB (R = 06:04UT; G = 05:57UT; B= 05:59UT)
   C14 @ F39; SKYnyx 2-0M CCD; Trutek R,G,B filters, Baader UV/IR rejection filter  





       Separate R, G, B channels.






Mars in 2007-8 ...

This opposition of Mars was ideally placed for northern hemisphere observers, but the
maximum apparent angular diameter reached only 15.9" at best.


    12.2.08
     R(55%)RGB  18:18 UT
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Dark Mare Acidalium projecting upwards from the white
    of the North Polar Cap (bottom of image).

    Angular diameter = 10.69"
    Phase = 92.8%  C.M. longitude = 46.7 deg.
    Altitude = 57 deg.   Seeing = 7-8/10



    10.2.08
     R(55%)RGB  20:28 UT
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Dark 'eye' above and left of centre is Solis Lacus.

    Angular diameter = 10.89"
    Phase = 93.1%
    C.M. longitude = 96.9 deg.
    Seeing = 7-8/10





The hour or so sequence of images of 19th December 2007 show the steady rotation
from right to left (west to east) of the planet as the famous 'African' shaped Syrtis Major
rotates progressively into view....


    19.12.07
     R(60%)RGB  (R=23:57UT G=00:01UT B=00:03UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Syrtis Major 'V' shape nicely displayed.
    Morning blue cloud over Hellespontus.

    Angular diameter = 15.88"
    Phase = 99.8%
    C.M. longitude = 262.4 deg.
    Altitude = 64 deg.
    Seeing = 7/10






    19.12.07
     R(95%)RGB  (R=23:00UT G=22:52UT B=22:55UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Syrtis Major 'V' shape rotated fully into view.

    Angular diameter = 15.88"
    Phase = 99.8%
    C.M. longitude = 248.5 deg.
    Altitude = 59 deg.
    Seeing = 6-7/10








    19.12.07
     R(60%)RGB  (R=22:45UT G=22:39UT B=22:42UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Syrtis Major 'V' shape fully rotated into view.

    Angular diameter = 15.88"
    Phase = 99.8%
    C.M. longitude = 244.8 deg.
    Altitude = 58 deg.
    Seeing = 6-7/10








The night of 12th-13th December 2007 showed progressively better seeing, culminating
in a very rare by U.K. standards 9/10 by 2 a.m.. The temperature (as on 19th) dropped
well below zero and my finger stuck to the frosted C14 tube!


    12.12.07
     R(95%)RGB  (R=23:11UT G=23:15UT B=23:17UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    To the right of centre is Sinus Meridiani and to the left
    Syrtis Major. Blue clouds to left (over Mare Tyrrhenum);
    and to the right (between Mare Serpentis and
    Hellespontus).   

    Angular diameter = 15.78"
    Phase = 99.2%
    C.M. longitude = 312.7 deg.
    Altitude = 63 deg. ; Seeing = 4-5/10





    13.12.07
     R(95%)RGB  (R=00:21UT G=00:26UT B=00:29UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    To the right of centre is Sinus Meridiani and to the left
    Syrtis Major.

    Angular diameter = 15.78"
    Phase = 99.2%
    C.M. longitude = 329.7 deg.
    Altitude = 62 deg. ; Seeing =4/10







    13.12.07
     R(95%)RGB  (R=01:08UT G=01:13UT B=01:05UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Close to centre of disk is Sinus Meridiani.
    In addition to the extensive white and blue clouds of the
    North Polar Hood at the bottom of the image other blue
    clouds abound. Notably over Syrtis Major to the extreme
    left (east), towards the south pole (top) and Mare
    Erythraeum (right limb).

    Angular diameter = 15.78"; Phase = 99.2%
    C.M. longitude = 341.2 deg.;  Altitude = 64 deg.;
    Seeing =5-6/10






    13.12.07
     R(95%)RGB  (R=01:37UT G=01:31UT B=01:34UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Close to centre of disk is Sinus Meridiani.
    In addition to the extensive white and blue clouds of the
    North Polar Hood at the bottom of the image other blue
    clouds abound. Notably over Syrtis Major to the extreme
    left (east), towards the south pole (top) and Mare
    Erythraeum (right limb).
    Angular diameter = 15.79"
    Phase = 99.2%
    C.M. longitude = 348.3 deg.
    Altitude = 63 deg. ; Seeing = 7/10








       This is a repeat of the above but just a pure RGB stack to
       show the clouds more dramatically.








    13.12.07
     RRGB  (R=01:42UT G=01:46UT B=01:49UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    In addition to the extensive white and blue clouds of the
    North Polar Hood at the bottom of the image other blue
    clouds abound. Notably over Syrtis Major to the extreme
    left (east), towards the south pole (top) and Mare
    Erythraeum (right limb).

    Angular diameter = 15.79"; Phase = 99.2%
    C.M. longitude = 349.5 deg.;  Altitude = 63 deg.; Seeing = 8/10



   
The pair of images above are a repeat of the previous one, but with R(60%)RGB and pure RGB combinations
respectively. Notice how the clouds appear progressively more conspicuous as the image becomes more pure RGB.





    13.12.07
     RRGB  (R=01:52UT G=01:46UT B=01:49UT)
      C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    In addition to the extensive white and blue clouds of the
    North Polar Hood at the bottom of the image other blue
    clouds abound. Notably over Syrtis Major to the extreme
    left (east), towards the south pole (top) and Mare
    Erythraeum (right limb).

    Angular diameter = 15.79"; Phase = 99.2%
    C.M. longitude = 351.9 deg.; Altitude = 63 deg.; Seeing = 9/10




Below are the separate R, G and B filtered images:





      01:44 UTC de-rotated in WinJupos (3 videos used)






    29.11.07
    R(65%)RGB  (R=00:05UT G=23:58UT B=00:13UT)
     C14 @ F44; SKYnyx 2-0M; Trutek RGB; Baader UV/IR rejection.

    Solis Lacus is dark spot above centre
    with Valles Marineris just below it.

    Angular diameter = 14.91"
    Phase = 96.6%
    C.M. longitude = 90.0 deg.
    Altitude = 53 deg.
    Seeing = 4/10


C14 @ F44, SKYnyx 2-0M camera, Trutek RGB filters and Baader UV/IR rejection filter.





  16.11.07  05:05 UT

  Syrtis Major and Hellas are shown well as is
  the blue north polar hood (NPH). A few of the
  small dark spots can be identified in Google Mars
  as dark floored craters.

  Angular diameter = 13.68"
  Phase = 93.6%
  C.M. longitude = 280.4 deg.
  Altitude = 56 deg.;  Seeing = 6/10

C14 @ F44, SKYnyx 2-0M camera, Trutek RGB filters and Baader UV/IR rejection filter.







        4.11.07  05:54 UT

        'Spidery' Aurorae Sinus is shown well with
        Nilokeras jutting out from the blue NPH.
        The dark spot towards the right, just above
        centre is Solis Lacus with Valles Marineris
        looking like the Greek letter Lambda below.

        Angular diameter = 12.48"; Phase = 91.1%
        C.M. longitude = 42.5 deg.; Alt. = 55 deg.; Seeing = 6/10


C14 @ F44, SKYnyx 2-0M camera, Trutek RGB filters and Baader UV/IR rejection filter.




16.9.07

The dark spot of Solis Lacus, just left of and above centre, is followed beneath by the
somewhat blurred dark spots of the calderas of the volcanoes Ascraeus, Pavonis and
Arsia Mons and the more distinct and solitary spot of Olympus Mons.

Angular diameter = 8.84"; seeing = 4/10; C11 @ F40; Lu075M camera.
03:05 UT
Left to right: B, G, R, RRGB filters.




13.9.07

The dark horizontal band of Mare Sirenum dominates the upper portion of the image,
whilst at the terminator are the indistinct dark spots of the calderas of the volcanoes
Ascraeus, Pavonis and Arsia Mons, with Olympus Mons left of and below centre.

Angular diameter = 8.69"; seeing = 7-8/10; C11 @ F40; Lu075M camera.
02:53 UT





Mars in 2005-6 ...

Although this opposition of Mars was not as close to Earth as the famous 2003 opposition,
Mars was much better placed for northern hemisphere observers, gaining a much greater
altitude in our skies.

The Martain southern hemisphere was enjoying its summer season, so the southern
polar ice cap (top of images) was small. In the northern hemisphere the blue haze of the
polar hood became a significant feature as winter set in there.

24.1.06
Mars had an angular diameter of only 9.43" and phase 89.6%.
Lu075M CCD on 30cm Meade LX200 @ F44 with Trutek RRGB
filters and Baader UV/IR blocker.
20.19 UTC

Detail much harder to see now as Mars retreats. Dark central 'blob' is Solis Lacus.



23.12.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 13.22" and phase 92.9%.
Lu075M CCD @ F44 on 30cm Meade LX200 with Trutek
RRGB filters.
19:53 UTC
The dark feature to the left of centre is Sinus Meridiani.
Shrouded in blue clouds is Mare Acidalium.


19.12.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 13.81" and phase 93.5%.
Lu075M CCD @ F44 on 30cm Meade LX200 with Trutek RGB
filters. (R=22:37UT; G=22:34UT; B=22:30UT)
 RRGB
Dark central 'blob' is Solis Lacus. The dark feature to the left of it is
the famous Valles Marineris, a canyon 4000km long! Notice the tiny
South Polar cap near the top and the blue icey north polar hood.


17.12.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 14.13" and phase 93.9%.
Lu075M CCD @ F41 on 30cm Meade LX200 with Trutek
RRGB filters.

21:28 UTC                               21:46 UTC

Dark central 'blob' is Solis Lacus. The dark feature to the left of it is
Valles Marineris.


6.11.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 19.94" and phase 100%.
Lu075M CCD @ F46 on 30cm Meade LX200 with Trutek RRGB
filters. This camera was faulty and so the image quality is
poorer than it would have been!
23:29 UTC
The bright circular spot: Olympus Mons volcano.
Other bright, yellowish clouds beneath Olympus Mons are dust storms.
Dark feature just below centre and towards the left is Mare Sirenum.

19.11.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 18.62" and phase 99%.
ATK-1HS CCD on 30cm Meade LX200 @ F38 RGB filters.
21:53 UTC


23.10.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 19.99" and phase 98.5%.
Seeing fair. Transparency mediocre to quite poor.
ATK-1HS CCD on 30cm Meade LX200 @ F41.

  03:23 UTC
Notice the dust cloud on the right edge of the disk in Argyre.
Syrtis Major near left edge.




9.9.05
Mars had an angular diameter of 15.06" and phase 88.3%.
Seeing Pickering 6 and better. Transparency fair, limiting mag. 5.5 or better.
ATK-1HS CCD on 30cm Meade LX200 @ F41.

Mars in 3-D...!
             

The above pair of images were taken 48 minutes apart on 9th September 2005.
By crossing your eyes at a typical distance of 1 metre from the monitor you can
cause the images to merge and hey presto, you have a 3-D view! Mars rotates
on its axis every 24hrs 37mins - very similar to Earth, so in 48 minutes it
shows a noticeable rotation.

Solis Lacus rotating into view around the right edge with Valles Marineris canyon system beneath it
in the shape of the Greek letter Lambda!




Mars in 2003 ...

In 2003, Mars made its closest approach to earth since 57,000BC. Although it was
very low in the sky as seen from England, use of multiple exposures with CCD enabled
some images to be obtained.

3-D

                          

The above pair of images were taken 29 minutes apart at 23:58 and 00:27 on the night
of 29-30th August 2003. By crossing your eyes at a typical distance of 60cm from the
monitor you can cause the images to merge and hey presto, you have a 3-D view!


   29.8.03

  19.8.03     20.8.03    22.7.03




Here are some scans from my log book showing a few drawings I
made using my 49cm F4.6 Newtonian reflector:-

24.3.97


 7.4.97